Newsletter & Mailing list

Name and Email address

Contact Info
an image
UK BCI Research Network
Administrator
i {DOT} daly {AT} reading {DOT} ac {DOT} uk

Ian Daly
School of Systems Engineering
Whiteknights Campus
University of Reading
Reading
Berkshire
RG6 6AY
UK

Welcome

an image

Welcome to the UK BCI Research Community website.

This site aims to bring together multi-disciplinary researchers from neurology, clinical practice, computer science, mathematics, psychology and other related areas to collaborate and share resources.


“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.”
- Dr Carl Sagan

Aims of the UK Research Community

The UK BCI Research Community is a multi-institution, multi-disciplinary group of researchers from across the UK who are interested in all aspects of Brain Computer Interface research and development. Its members include; neurologists, psychologists, engineers, computer scientists, biologists and experts in Human Computer Interaction (HCI).

BCI is a growth area internationally and in order for the UK to be competitive collaboration and communication between UK institutions is essential. There are a number of ways we can help each other and further the cause of BCI research in the UK. This site aims to address, among other ares, the following ...


Join Now!

Highlights

2011-02-21
BCI workshop

The University of Reading will be hosting a BCI workshop in conjunction with g.tec on Friday 15th April.

The aim is to demonstrate and showcase what is achievable with BCI, deliver basic training on the setup and how to train and apply a classifier to various commonly targeted potentials. It will be hands on and interactive with a number of core members of the g.tec team and several sets of equipment which should be able to accommodate a maximum of 30 people.


Read more...

2010-11-30
CHI 2011 WORKSHOP - BRAIN AND BODY INTERFACES: DESIGNING FOR MEANINGFUL INTERACTION
The brain and body provide a wealth of information about the physiological, cognitive and emotional state of the user. There is an increasing opportunity to use physiological data as a form of input control for computerised systems. As entry level sensors become more cheaper and widespread, physiological interfaces are liable to become more pervasive in our society (e.g., through mobile phones and similar devices).
Read more...

2010-11-08
Biomimetic and biofeedback approaches for brain machine interface

K. Nazarpour and A. Jackson have published a paper in Proc. APSIPA ASC 2010.

Abstract In this paper, we elaborate on the distinction between classic approaches towards brain machine interface (BMI), that is Biomimetic and Biofeedback, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. For biomimetic BMI, we briefly report results of a novel constrained Kalman filtering-optimization mechanism for prediction of myoelectric signals from neural spike recordings in a behaving macaque monkey. For the Biofeedback BMI, we review early works on operant conditioning and our recent results on emulating BMI by a myoelectric control interface.


Read more...